The Secret of Aiwass

The Unicursal Hexagram of Thelema

The Unicursal Hexagram of Thelema (click link to read about Thelema at Wikipedia)

Many of the internal training exercises in the Cabal Fang martial arts program are modified versions of the now classic Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn rituals which contain lots of Hebrew words and phrases.  So that ours will have more universal appeal, I’ve been experimenting with substituting Proto-Indo European (PIE) for the Hebrew.

One of the PIE words that came up in my research is aiwesi which means “always” or “forever.”  It occurs to me that this is very close to the name Aiwass, the mythical being Aleister Crowley claims dictated the Book of the Law.   Is it possible, I wonder, that this isn’t a coincidence?

Could Crowley have consciously, subconsciously or instinctively chosen the name Aiwass because of its proximity to aiwesi, the root word for always?   Is there an expert out there who can tell us the state of PIE-related linguistic research circa 1900 so we can determine if Crowley could have known this?   And lastly, can we consider the possibility — assuming that Aiwass is a real being independent of Crowley as devout Thelemites believe —  that this mysterious entity chose its name based on its proximity to a universal word associated with things eternal

Fascinating, isn’t it?

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2 responses to “The Secret of Aiwass

  1. There’s a book (isn’t there always!?) by, I think, Cath Thomas. Gordon White interviewed her on Rune Soup recently. Her mentor in magic, I think Jim Harris? Not sure about that…

    I’m drifting far from the point. Cath’s new book is about the numerology of the book of the law. There’s some tremendously interesting mathematics going on, and the book’s letter-frequency count is off by a LOT from what’s common in the English language.

    So I don’t know the state of play for Indo-European studies in 1903. But the book is weirder than we know, and its alleged author developed a radical new gematria alongside its startling, poetic, radicalism.

    And that’s mighty weird.

    • Holy crap! You should hear my son’s story about being lost in the stacks of the University of Washington library at 2:00 am. A book catches his eye and he opens it. He has to sit down and read it because it blows his mind…it’s the Book of the Law. He views the book as a shining example of books as art objects, as word-paint, as artistic vision. So fascinating…

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