My New E-book Available Now

It’s so fresh that it isn’t up yet on iTunes or B&N, but you can get it at Smashwords — just click here.

This workbook is short and laser-focused on realizing your mind-body-spirit potential — so start your transformation today!

CARCAJOU a poem

cARCAJOU

Slap tail beavers plunkin’ in the pond water
Duffers under cover snacking on coon fodder
Kids on bikes runnin’ circles ’round the lake
Are rangers checking billets?  Oh make no mistake

Free as a bird
Bury me with my boots on
Can’t polish a turd
But I can can sure get my swoop on

Carcajou, skunk bear, badger, teddy rat
Ain’t got nothin’ on me so don’t forget
Filly ran off now I’m pinin’ for a Donna
Eyes skinned bald and I’m checkin’ out the fauna

Free as a bird
Bury me with my boots on
Can’t polish a turd
But I can sure get my swoop on

Engrams, orgone, Radithor and more
Nothin’ ever works and I’m feeling mighty sore
Dead as a hammer and I’m numb as a stone
Get up and go done got up and gone

Free as a bird
Bury me with my boots on
Can’t polish a turd
But I can sure get my swoop on


“Hey Mitch, what’s this poetry thing all about?” I want to collaborate with Blue Öyster Cult and I’m hoping the Öyster Boys will think this would make a good lyric.

Did you know I wrote a paranormal/mystery/romance book inspired by Blue Öyster Cult’s lyrical themes?  Click here to download it here for free!

The cover to my book “Chatters on the Tide” inspired by the music of Blue Öyster Cult

Douthat Adventures

CCC patch

Went on a little getaway this weekend.  Headed up to Douthat State Park with the family.  It’s the only park in Virginia (at least that I’ve found) where you can have fun camping in the middle of the summer.  It’s easy to beat the heat up there.  The park’s campling area is one of the highest in the state and there’s a sandy beach on the lake for swimming.

This park was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps, and it hasn’t changed much in the last eighty plus years.  The quality of the construction is such that many of the cabins and stone buildings are virtually unchanged and still in use.

Here’s a little handout concerning how Douthat State Park was built

I’ve waxed poetic about the CCC before.  Let me just say that I’ve heard a ton of talk about UBI — both for and against — but I haven’t heard a single word about any kind of work relief program.  And I sure haven’t heard a word about bringing back the CCC.

Personally, I think UBI and free college tuition are both hard sells when we have a national debt of $16 trillion.  But a program like the CCC — which is basically a work relief program that also provides vocational training — seems like something we could all vote for.

Anyway, here’s a little video about the trip.

Hugh Thompson Jr. : Training Involution #165

This week’s T.I. is in video format.  Dig it.

A Fisher of Men

Robert Mitchell — November 21, 1934 ~ July 8, 2008

Today is the 11th anniversary of my father’s passing. Pop was a pretty incredible person.  No, he was not a great businessman, scientist, inventor, writer, statesman or orator.  He wasn’t remarkably successful by any conventional measurement.

What made him incredible was that he spent the last decade or so of his life walking with Christ despite serious trials.  The more money the world took from him, the less materialistic he became.  As his health got worse, he only became more patient and at peace.  The more loved ones who were taken away, the more he loved those who remained.  The more the world conspired to try and make him bitter, the more he smiled.

And the closer death came the less he feared.

Pop’s pocket Bible — a special edition with instructions for bringing people to faith (a reference to Matthew 4:19 “And he saith unto them, Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

As a young man Pop considered entering the clergy but decided against it.  His reason was the same he gave for not taking promotions at work and for not pursuing a career in law enforcement after his service in the Military Police.  He didn’t want to be the kind of person who told other people what to do or how to behave.  And he didn’t want to give anybody the impression that he thought he was better than anybody else.

The irony is that his humility made him the ideal clerical candidate, yet I’m the one I’m in seminary.  And my humility is far from legendary.  When I was a young man, my mom always said that my lack of humility would be my downfall if I didn’t overcome it. 

And so, on this anniversary of Pop’s passing, I sit and appreciate Mom’s warning and Pop’s example.  I admire my father’s humility and strength and try to emulate them as best I can.

And I pray that someday I will be a good fisher of men.

Sacred Words: Training Involution #164

Egyptian god Thoth

Should anyone other than a politically correct dweeb, a prime-time-ready talking head, garden-variety prude, holier-than-thou twit, or virtue-signalling chuckle-head want to clean up their potty mouth?

Sure.  Because speech is sacred.

Our greatest myths and holy books embody this truth.  According to the Egyptians,

“Thoth is the mediator through whom the world is brought into manifestation. He is the Tongue of Rā, the Herald of the Will of Rā,  and the Lord of Sacred Speech.”¹

God separates light from darkness — Sistine Chapel

In Genesis 1 of the Holy Bible, God speaks the universe into being.  He says, “Let there be light: and there was light.”  Later in John 1, when speaking of Christ, we hear,

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  He was in the beginning with God.  All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.  In him was life; and the life was the light of men.”

The ancients revered the ability to recite poetry and holy words.  They embodied the idea of sacred speech.   Modern people have mostly surrendered in the battle against profane, rude and crude speech.  And few are able to recite any beautiful words even if they wanted to.

When I was a kid, we had to memorize poems, speeches and scripture.  Why?  So that we could have command of the words on a fundamental level.

Sacred Words: Training Involution #164

Restriction breeds creativity, not freedom (for more on this topic watch this video).   Let’s put some restrictions on ourselves and see if it drives our creativity.

  • Warm up thoroughly, at least 8 minutes.
  • Hobble yourself.  Take a scrap of rope, an old Karate belt, Yoga strap, etc. and hobble yourself such that your ankles cannot get more than a shoulder’s width apart.²
  • Complete a gauntlet.  Set a timer for 8 x 2:00.  You may do this with hand strikes only or with a practice weapon, your choice (I used my walking stick).  Complete this twice:  (1) Strikes vs. Heavy Bag (2) Get-ups (3) Sit-ups with two heavy bag strikes at top of each (4)  Strikes vs. air while doing Prisoner Get-ups. ³
  • Cool down for  3 minutes and then hit the showers.
  • Hold your tongue.  Refrain from swearing for one week and see how you feel about it.  For extra credit, memorize some pretty words, some poetry, a piece of scripture, etc.  Write it down on a scrap of paper, put it in your pocket, and study it every hour or so for a couple of days until you own it.  Another way to do it is to make a voice recording on your phone and play it over and over until you can recite along with it.  This is good for your brain and for your soul.

¹ Mead, G. R. S, Thrice-Greatest Hermes, Vol. 1, [The Thesophical Publishing Society, London 1906]

² I do several of these sorts of training exercises every month for self-defense practice — hobbled, one hand tucked into my belt, one eye patched, a rock in my shoe, etc.

³  Prisoner Get-up: Drop to left knee, drop right knee to get on both knees, rise up to right knee only, then stand up.  Next time drop right knee first.  Alternate sides.

Happy Independence Day and Why it Matters

Happy Independence Day! Reposting this from last year because I’m, well, lazy.

Robert Mitchell Jr.

Happy July 4th to all my friends in the USA and around the world!

In our busy lives it’s easy to lose sight of America’s greatness and to forget why we shook the world in the first place.

This July 4th let’s remember that the United States of America was the first time since the rise of feudalism that people could own their own land and govern themselves.

That’s a big deal.

Sure, there had long been parliaments and senates and such, but kings, queens, emperors and empresses had really been in charge.  Right up until 1776, the British Crown could force you to board troops, could levy taxes against you without recording your vote, and even put you in irons without a hearing or seize your stuff.  Escheatment still survives to this day, a vestigial organ reminding us that unclaimed property reverts to the ownership of the state…

View original post 83 more words