Tag Archives: four

Rope and Rag: Martial Arts Training Involution #223

Are you enjoying the new four-fold format?  Please comment and let me know!

Rope and Rag: Martial Arts T.I. #223

  • Warm-up thoroughly for at at least 8 minutes. Do 2-3 minutes each of (a) jumping rope (b) light calisthenics and (c) shadowboxing, forms, or light heavy bag work, or 8 minutes of MBF.
  • 8 mins of martial fitness.  You can do this one unarmed or, if you train with weapons, with a dull training weapon.  Set timer for 8 x 1:00.  Round 1: strike the air while doing Russian Squats.  Round 2: Low Crawl forward and backward up and down your training area making sure your profile is as low as possible.  Round 3: Get-ups.  Round 4: Strikes vs. heavy bag.  Repeat once more for 8 total rounds.  The first time you hit the heavy bag do so standing, the second time do so grounded.  Consider tying a rag to your heavy bag (s) to simulate hair.  See video below.
  • 150 max power kicks vs. heavy bag.  Go as fast and as hard as you can.  Record your time in your training journal and beat it next time.
  • Learn to tie a bowline knot.  The right knot at the right time can save your bacon.  If you need a cinch-proof loop in the end of a line, say you need loop to make a lasso or anchor a line to a post or branch, then you need bowline knot.  See photo set below.   Practice makes perfect.  Tie it and untie it 25 times until you have it down.
  • Sacred reading part 4.  As we’ve learned in previous weeks, the essence of sacred reading is to analyze the things you read in four different ways: literally, morally, allegorically and anagogically.  Consider that these ways of reading can be applied to all forms of input, not just to sacred literature.  Try reading a newspaper article or interpreting a friend’s story in these four ways.   Everything is a story, and every story has at least four layers of meaning awaiting discovery.
  • Journal As always, log everything you did and thought about in your training journal, even if it’s only a few lines.  If it ain’t in the training journal it didn’t happen!



TWO MARTIAL ARTS DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAMS AVAILABLE. 100% free and operated through my non-profit, Cabal Fang is a martial arts for personal development, self-defense and fitness. If Frontier Rough ‘n’ Tumble — the fighting arts, survival skills, lifeways and ethos of the colonial and indigenous peoples of North American during the frontier period (1607 – 1912) — is more to your liking, check out Bobcat Frontier Martial Arts, my for-profit martial art project. Click either photo to get started today!

Martial Arts Training Involution #222 — NEW FORMAT!

phototropism

All about phototropism!

Starting with this week’s T.I. there will be a whole new format!  Each T.I. will include a foursome feast:

  • A fitness element — something to work your martial grit
  • A fighting element — something to work your martial skills
  • A faith element — a meditation, contemplation, prayer or sacred reading.  And finally the fourth element, which is all new…
  • A frontier element — a technique, skill, insight or tip relating to old-time lifeways, like nature observation and such.

Why?  To shake things up a little and promote my Frontier Rough ‘n’ Tumble  (“FRT”) program of course!

Sign up for the Bobcat FRT program  at Mitch’s General Store for just $19.99/month.  When you sign up you get a Bobcat Martial Arts hat and t-shirt ($29.98 value), a white bandanna and membership certificate ($9.99 value), a paperback copy of The Wildwood Workbook ($7.99 value) and your first training module ($9.99 value).  Each month you get a new module, book or other set of assignments and a 30-minute coaching call.  Just keep a training journal and send it in each month for evaluation and promotion.  You’ll be feeling fine as frog fur!

And now without further flourishing…

Phototropism: Martial Arts T.I. #222

  • Warm-up thoroughly for at at least 8 minutes. Do 2-3 minutes each of (a) jumping rope (b) light calisthenics and (c) shadowboxing, forms, or light heavy bag work, or 8 minutes of MBF.
  • Escape Plan. This one combines the fitness and fighting elements into a single delicious layered casserole of goodness.  See video below.  Set timer for fifteen intervals of 1 minute.  Run a minute, shadowbox for a minute, and do martial-relevant calisthenics for a minute.  Repeat four more times and your done.  Adjust running speed down to jogging or walking, and add rest breaks as needed, to suit your fitness level.  When you’re done, cool down by taking a walk and look at some trees.
  • Learn to find north using phototropism.  Plants naturally grow toward the light — even trees (see picture above).  Branches on the north side of a trees tend to be more vertical, those on the south more horizontal.  Go for a walk on a tree-lined street that runs east-west and look at the trees.  Ain’t that something?  Could save your life someday!
  • Sacred reading part 3.  This month’s symbol is the Book.  The essence of sacred reading is to analyze what you read in four different ways: literally, morally, allegorically and anagogically.  Last week you did some reading and some analyzing.  This week, memorize a meaningful snippet of sacred literature and recite it to yourself often during the week.  Memorizing sacred words gives you a special type of understanding — not so that you can impress your friends or hit people over the head with fancy words, but so that your command of the ideas can shape and hone they way you think.
  • Journal.  As always, log everything you did and thought about in your training journal, even if it’s only a few lines.  If it ain’t in the training journal it didn’t happen!



TWO MARTIAL ARTS DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAMS AVAILABLE. 100% free and operated through my non-profit, Cabal Fang is a martial arts for personal development, self-defense and fitness. If Frontier Rough ‘n’ Tumble — the fighting arts, survival skills, lifeways and ethos of the colonial and indigenous peoples of North American during the frontier period (1607 – 1912) — is more to your liking, check out Bobcat Frontier Martial Arts, my for-profit martial art project. Click either photo to get started today!

Tetragram: Martial Arts Training Involution #214

chariot tarot

Last week we saw that the Chariot Tarot card encapsulates our June focuses (counters, triggers and flow drills on the martial side and the spiritual symbol the Cross) because it depicts what’s possible if you are maximally engaged (in the flow) and maximally integral (living out the Cross). In other words, you are unified in thoughts, desires, actions and beliefs.

But the Chariot also symbolizes the quadrigathe four ways of interpreting scripture which are named after the Roman quadrida, a chariot drawn by four horses. Those four ways are literally, allegorically, morally and mystically. Four perspectives are necessary in order to see the big picture (that’s why there are four Gospels).

It’s all about the fours. The Egyptian Hieratic number four is jifdáw, which literally means “rectangle.” The canopy of the chariot is a rectangle with four posts, the charioteer’s chest is adorned with a square, and the entire artistic layout is in squares and rectangles that mirror the four-letter name of God (the Tetragrammaton, YHWH). The charioteer is oriented by a 4-pointed internal compass (the Cross) and he’s in “the zone.”

All of this is embedded in the Hermetic Quaternary — to Know, to Will, to Dare, to Keep Silent — the Hermetic “compass” that is equated with the Christian cross.

The Hermetic Quaternary is encoded in esoteric Christianity and right there in the scripture — in both the Old Testament and in the Gospels as spoken by Christ. Read more about this in the next issue of SHIFT which comes out tomorrow (subscribe here).
Tetragram: Martial Arts Training Involution #214

  • Warm-up thoroughly for at at least 8 minutes. Do 2-3 minutes each of (a) jumping rope (b) light calisthenics and (c) shadowboxing, forms, or light heavy bag work, or 8 minutes of MBF.
  • How many hours have you spent “in the flow” this week? When you’re in the flow, walking with Christ, or whatever you prefer to call it, you are relaxed, happy, productive and engaged — without effort, tension, or self-consciousness. If the answer is less than an hour per day on average I suggest journaling daily. Analyze your entries. Figure out what gets you into that space and what pushes you out. Set some benchmarks. The more time you spend there the better.
  • Complete “Staying Alive.” In self-defense you can’t internalize a action/reaction flow chart — you have to prepare to fight tired and from any position and learn to fight in the flow. Set timer for 5 x 4:00/1:00. First round, run away from your training area. Second round, run back. Third round, shadowbox. Fourth round, grapple your floor bag. Round five, wrestle your floor bag. Beginners, take as many 12-count breaks as you need to finish. Advanced players, work through the rest breaks. See video below.
  • Contemplation. After you’ve cooled down for 3 minutes, set a timer for 10 minutes. Assume posture of choice and regulate breathing to a slow and steady rhythm. Keep your eyes open and do not fidget, wiggle or scratch. Allow your thoughts to dissipate like ripples on a pond and your mind to approach a state of calm and relaxed awareness. When the timer beeps, record what you did and what you experienced in your training journal. If you don’t take bearings and spot landmarks, you might get lost.



TWO MARTIAL ARTS DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAMS ARE AVAILABLE. 100% free and operated through my non-profit, Cabal Fang is a martial arts for personal development, self-defense and fitness. If Frontier Rough ‘n’ Tumble — the fighting arts, survival skills, lifeways and ethos of the colonial and indigenous peoples of North American during the frontier period (1607 – 1912) — is more to your liking, check out Bobcat Frontier Martial Arts, my for-profit martial art project. Click either photo to get started today!